Hate Crime

What is a hate crime?

Hate crimes are a criminal offence that are a result of a person or property being targeted due to another individual displaying hostility and/or prejudice towards another person.
Hate crimes can include the following;
• Disability
• Race/ethnicity
• Religion or belief
• Sexual Orientation
• Transgender Identity

Anyone can be a victim of a hate crime, and a victim does not have to be a part of a specific group.

All hate crimes and incidents should be reported to the authorities regardless of whether you’re a victim, witness or reporting for someone else.

A victim of bullying due to their disability, race and ethnicity, religion or beliefs, sexual orientation or transgender identity is also dealt with as a hate crime incident.

Reporting a hate crime and why?

All hate crimes and incidents should be reported to the authorities regardless of whether you’re a victim, witness or reporting for someone else.

These crimes can include physical and verbal abuse, assault, domestic abuse, damage to property and any form of harassment.

Hate crimes can cause serious damage to a person, they can be destructive and cause permanent mental and physical ramifications, with some hate crimes leading to fatal circumstances.

In some cases, someone will make a passing comment about one of the above categories and think nothing of it, however that comment could be the final straw for someone who may be suicidal, with the criminal walking off not knowing the damage they have just created for someone else.

Where to go after being a victim of a hate crime?

After a hate crime many victims have nowhere to turn or aren’t aware of the services available to them. After Hate aim to help victims of hate crimes and incidents become aware of the options and support networks out there for them to use.

To read more about after hate and how they can help you, please visit their website https://afterhate.org.uk/ for all information and services you may require.